Dec 082015
 

Passport-Launch-1

Today is a huge day for Inversoft. We have successfully launched our second product, Passport. Passport is a revolutionary way to add login, registration and single sign-on to your applications. Rather than go into all the details here, check out the Inversoft blog post about the launch:

https://www.inversoft.com/blog/2015/12/08/passport-user-management-platform/

We also got some great press at eWeek and BetaNews. Check those articles out here:

http://www.eweek.com/small-business/inversoft-passport-aims-to-simplify-secure-log-ins.html

http://betanews.com/2015/12/08/new-solution-helps-businesses-offer-single-sign-ons/

Nov 142008
 

Been working this week on Savant 2.0. My first thought when I started writing Savant 2.0 was to write a complete replacement for both Maven and Ant that used Groovy and allowed for both a plugin model as well as a simple build script approach. This was too much to bite off when you consider all of the other changes to the dependency management part of Savant we made for 2.0.

For JCatapult we created a set of Ant build scripts that could be plugged into any build file and reused. It looks like this:

This model meant that the build.xml file had nothing but import statements in it. It made life much simpler when working with numerous projects that were virtually the same.

The part I didn’t like was that I loved this model. I liked it so much I started using them for everything including Java.net Commons, Savant and internal Inversoft projects. This meant that I had a dependency on JCatapult, which for all intents and purposes is a webapp platform. This seemed strange.

I started thinking about moving these files over to Savant. At first I just figured I would migrate the entire set of Ant plugins from JCatapult over and be done. However, once I moved them over it meant that I would need to start pulling in plugins for a variety of projects. Some would come from Savant and others might come from JCatapult or elsewhere. This was due to the fact that some of the JCatapult plugins were very specific to JCatapult projects. I could force developers to download each plugin they needed from various places, install them in a specific directory and then update their build files before they could build any projects. It all started to look very clunky.

Then I remembered (duh!) that Savant is a dependency management tool and it can find, version and download ANYTHING. Why not apply this pattern to Ant build files in the form of plugins?

So, I did just that!

It works great. The way it works is that I wrote a simple Java class that figures everything out and then generates an ant build file. The full process looks like this:

  1. New script called svnt invokes a Savant class
  2. This new class parses the project.xml file, which defines the plugins the project will be using
  3. It downloads any missing plugins to the Savant local cache
  4. Since the plugins are JAR files, it explodes the JAR file to ~/.savant/plugins under a specific directory just for that plugin
  5. This class then generates a temporary build.xml file that imports all of the plugins the project needs
  6. It outputs the location of this temporary build.xml file
  7. The svnt script executes Ant passing it the location of this build file (i.e. ant -f /tmp/tmpbuild.xml)

And that’s it. Nothing fancy, just a little sugar on top of Ant to provide downloading of plugins and build files automatically.

The last part of this exercise is to write a bunch of plugins. Since these are just Ant build scripts and we’ve all created hundreds of those so it should be a simple matter of tweaking them ever so slightly to work when imported.

My new projects don’t have a build.xml file (but if they do it is imported to add additional targets or override targets from the plugins) and just contain the Savant project.xml file. This file now defines plugins and it looks like this:

That’s it. If anyone is interested in trying it out, I should have a release available in the next few days along with some documentation for the 5-10 plugins I will have ready. If you want to try and build all this by hand right now, you’ll need to install JCatapult since Savant uses that until it can be self building.

Aug 012008
 

I went to the 37 Signals event last night sponsored by CPB. The speaker was Jason Fried, who is a founder of the company, a designer and all around smart guy.

Jason spoke mainly about small business. He presented a list of things that companies can do to become more productive and better at whatever they do. His list included things such as:

  • 4 day work weeks
  • Virtual companies
  • Saying no to your customers more often than not
  • Do the easiest thing possible
  • Don’t design, just do
  • Don’t go to meetings
  • Turn off email and IM

A number of these things I do each day including turning off email and IM when I’m really cranking, be as virtual as possible, reduce lengthy design and just start working. Overall, Jason has great ideas for small companies. 37 Signals is probably in the 3-5 million dollar range or lower, with about 2-3 million dollars of overhead or more. They are a life-style company and will not grow beyond a certain threshold because of these ideals.

Having worked for a large company, worked on vastly more complex systems than Jason, created many open source frameworks and now starting my own company, I found Jason’s ideas exciting and total crap at the same time. I regularly find myself battling with creating solutions that will scale, versus creating the simplest solution. This naturally occurs to anyone who has ever worked with applications that do hundreds of millions of transactions per day (or per hour).

I pushed Jason a bit to see where he would break ranks with some of his ideals. From his responses, he absolutely would not abandon these ideals at any cost. However, I think this is a marketing tool created by 37 signals to promote their products as well as Ruby on Rails. The reason I know this to be true, is that Jason is intelligent and capable or understanding moderately complex problems with more ease than say a college student. In addition, he spoke briefly about how a single feature request such as adding time-stamps to ToDo list items can have a larger impact than any customer might think. These features requests require a large amount of thought and planning because they impact the entire system. Similarly, changes to the Rails internals require a large amount of thought and testing to ensure they don’t break existing applications.

This dichotomy is something that is a fact of life. It is something engineers, product managers and executives must deal with, no matter how small or large your company is. 37 Signals has built a reputation that they can safely ignore these problems and be wildly successful. However, it is 95% smoke and mirrors. The reality is that 37 Signals is composed completely of phenomenal employees who can work in complex domains without losing their minds. The can distill complexity into manageable pieces and then combine those pieces in the end to produce a complex yet functional system.

Jul 282008
 

Just read an interesting new I, Cringely about a piece of software named Talkinator. The technology seems just like a new IRC for the web with some APIs and Web 2.0 style, but that wasn’t what caught my eye. What caught my attention was that Cringely states that Taklinator doesn’t allow profanity. Being that Inversoft’s main product is a profanity filter, I had to try it out. It failed pretty badly.

Of course it catches your straight forward profanity like ass and fuck, but it does very little for anything more complex.

Here are some examples of stuff it doesn’t handle:

$hit
asslips
assface
phuck
fuk you
|)ick
sh it

That’s just a few, but the list goes on. I definitely think that people don’t understand the complexity that comes with attempting to filter profanity. It is much more difficult than it seems. I definitely think Talkinator should check out Inversoft’s Profanity Filter.